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  • Tags: Limestone

10 Items

Limestone funerary relief of a woman

This limestone bust of a woman is now in the garden of the National Museum of Damascus.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Limestone funerary relief of a deceased couple

This limestone relief in the garden of the National Museum of Damascus depicts a deceased couple between two columns with an unfinished looking garland displayed above their heads.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Limestone representation of a deity with solar rays and a crescent moon

This detail of a relief in the garden of the National Museum of Damascus depicts a lunar deity framed within a crescent moon and wearing a radiate crown of solar rays.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Views of artefacts in the garden of Damascus National Museum

Views of the garden of the National Museum in Damascus that is used to display primarily Classical and Late Antique sculpture, sarcophagi and architectural elements.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Roman Sarcophagus

This limestone sarcophagus is unfinished as the wreath is roughly blocked out in the lower part of the tomb, but the eagle on the lid looks relatively well finished.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Limestone Funerary Effigy of a Man

This limestone carving is a funerary effigy for an unknown man.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Sarcophagus with mythological figures and swags

This limestone sarcophagus is decorated with mythological figures and stylised foliate swags.

Type: Museum Exhibit
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Limestone Funerary Effigy of a Woman

This limestone carving is a funerary effigy for an unknown woman.

Type: Museum Exhibit
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Hawwarin

Hawwarin was known as Evaria in late antiquity and is recorded as being the seat of two bishoprics. It appears to date from the Roman era as there is extensive evidence of Roman spolia in the Byzantine remains in the town. The local population talk of there having been seven basilicas in the settlement and evidence of three of these is still extant, although only one has been excavated thus far - by a Syrian team led by Wedad Khoury of the DGAM. The Roman dressed limestone blocks were carried to the site from some distance away as there are no quarries in the vicinity of the town and the modern dwellings are mud brick or cement. At the centre of the settlement is the mysterious "burj" or tower, which local people believe to have been part of an Umayyad hunting lodge, but which is built with Roman spoil and may well date from the Byzantine period as its nearest equivalent structure is the C6th stone tower at Qasr al-Hayr al-Gharbi. However, unlike the Qasr and neighbouring Khans/Caravanserai this tower has entrances to both the north and south rather than the single entrance that is the norm for such structures.

Type: Architecture
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The Primacy of Peter, Tabgha

Situated on the north-western shoreline of the Sea of Galilee, a short distance from the church of the Multiplication, is a modern church built on the site Christ reinstated Peter as the head of the Apostles. Little of the original Late Antique church remains, thought its foundations have been incorporated into the new church. A projection of limestone rock lies at its eastern end, before the altar. This is believed to be the Mensa Christi (table of Christ) upon which Christ and the Disciples ate, following the miraculous catch.

Type: Architecture
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